The fear of a near distant future, whereby the billionaires of the world and there technologies enslave most if not all of humanity – has been largely pulled from the pages of the famed book “Brave New World”, authored by Aldous Huxley.

Recently, having bought a copy printed in 1976 – has the foreword by the author and whereby he is writing about a potential shift away from the seemingly trajectory as with centralized systems and intersection of technology.

Thereby creating a movement away from the books conclusion and towards decentralization…


Below is excerpts from the book “Brave New World” by author Aldous Huxley, whereby in the foreword (published in 1946 and 15 years after initially published) the author writes – “I should probably get rid not only of some of the faults of the story, but also of such merits as it originally possessed. And so, resisting the temptation to wallow in artistic remorse, I prefer to leave both well and ill alone to think about something else.”

“… it seems worth while at least to mention the most serious defect in the story, which is this. The Savage is offered only two alternatives, an insane life in Utopia, or the life of a primitive in an Indian village, a life more human in some respects, but in others hardly less queer and abnormal. At the time the book was written this idea, that human beings are given free will in order to choose between insanity on the one hand and lunacy on the other, was on that I found amusing and regarded as quite possibly true.”

“… If I were now to rewrite the book, I would offer the Savage a third alternative. Between the Utopian and the primitive horns of this dilemma would lie the possibility of sanity… In this community economics would be decentralist … Science and technology would be used as though, like the Sabbath, they had been made for man, not (as at present and still more so in the Brave New World) as though man were to be adapted and enslaved by them. Religion would be the conscious and intelligent pursuit of man’s Final End, the unitive knowledge of the immanent Tao or Logos, the transcendent Godhead of Brahman. And the prevailing philosophy of life would be a kind of Higher Utilitarianism, in which the Greatest Happiness principle would be secondary to the Final End principle – the first question to be asked and answered in every contingency of life being: How will this thought or action contribute to, or interfere with, the achievement, by me and the greatest possible number of other individuals, of man’s Final End?”

“The theme of Brave New World is not the advancement of science as such; it is the advancement of science as it affects human individuals… It is only by means of the sciences of life that the quality of life can be radically changed.”

“…for the immediate future is likely to resemble the immediate past, and in the immediate past rapid technological changes, taking place in a mass-producing economy and among a population predominantly propertyless, have always tended to produce economic and social confusion. To deal with confusion, power has been centralized and government control increased. It is probable that all the world’s governments will be more or less completely totalitarian even before the harnessing of atomic energy; that they will be totalitarian during and after the harnessing seems almost certain. Only a large-scale popular movement toward decentralization and self-help can arrest the present tendency toward statism. At the present there is no sign that such a movement will take place.

“Indeed, unless we choose to decentralize and to use applied science, not as the end to which human beings are to be made the means, but as the means to producing a race of free individuals, we have only two alternatives to choose from: either a number of national, militarized totalitarianism, having as their root the terror of the atomic bomb and as their consequence the destruction of civilization (or, if the warfare is limited, the perpetuation of militarism); or else one supra-national totalitarianism, called into existence by the social chaos resulting from rapid technological progress in general and the atom revolution in particular, and developing, under the need for efficiency and stability, into the welfare-tyranny of Utopia. You pays your money and you takes your choice.” – 1946, Aldous Huxley.


Full read by the author, Aldous Huxley – 1946, Foreword, Brave New World

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